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Börsipäev 29. detsember

Kommentaari jätmiseks loo konto või logi sisse

  • Morgan Stanley raises their Merck (MRK 31.91) tgt to $38 from $34 in light of mgmt's recent cost cutting announcements and improved new product visibility; they see more upside as investors begin to embrace the potential of late-stage pipeline products and management's cost-cutting efforts

    Thomas Weisel says Silicon Laboratories (SLAB 37.36) has a new product portfolio that may deliver revenue growth above current expectations in 2H06; they believe that product ramps particularly in the ultra-low cost handset segment will eventually drive an increase in revenue expectations for 2H06.

    Morgan Stanley raises their Multi-Fineline (MFLX 36.68) tgt to $50 from $42 following positive preannouncement, as they beleive M-Flex is benefiting from even stronger Motorola demand than they had anticipated, and they now expect the momentum to continue into C1Q06 as new high-end models ramp

    ThinkEquity cuts their Symantec (SYMC 17.31) tgt to $20 from $27 as they believe there may be more bad news in the near term (e.g., consumer decline, more ratable revenue recognition), and they see few catalysts for near-term revenues and earnings acceleration

  • Rev Shark:

    Keep a 2006 Framework, but Remain Adaptable

    Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders and absurdities no doubt crept in; forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day; begin it well and serenely and with too high a spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense.

    -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

    We are nearing the 2005 finish line, and many investors are starting to look ahead to what the new year might bring. Although the sentiment polls reflect a high level of optimism, there seems to be a steady flow of negativity in many year-ahead predictions. Although the economy is plodding along, the Fed is sounding more dovish, valuations are fairly reasonable and energy prices are falling, many feel that 2006 will be a very difficult year for the market.

    The primary worry that many folks have is that a weaker housing market will crimp the consumer. Not only have consumers been able to use their home equity as an ATM, but the steady appreciation has also produced a "wealth effect" that kept consumer confidence high.

    I see more reasons to be optimistic rather than pessimistic about 2006, but as always I don't find a lot of value in trying to anticipate these things. Predictions about the year ahead can help provide a framework in which to approach the market, but we always must be prepared to adapt and react to changes as events unfold.

    Right now our focus should be on how we close out the two remaining days we have in the year. Many folks are quite disappointed that we haven't managed a better year-end rally. It has been anticipated, and so far we have nothing much to show for it. Many have thrown in the towel, declared the Santa Claus rally dead and will be looking to get busy once again after the first of the year.

    The big question we confront right now is whether or not we will see an end of the year window-dressing bounce. I believe there is a good chance that the buyers will step up and try to boost some of their favorites.

    The motivation for this isn't any great mystery. The market is dominated by mutual funds and professional money managers who live and die by how they perform vis-ą-vis a benchmark index. Their goal is to bolster their relative performance as much as possible. They will even settle for better absolute performance as it is useful in raising more capital.

    How do you boost relative performance? You make sure your biggest holdings finish the year strong. If you are overweight Apple (AAPL:Nasdaq) and Google (GOOG:Nasdaq), the best thing you can do is try to push them up a greater percentage than the overall market. However, if they are pushed up, they usually take the broader market with them so they need to push those stocks up even further and so on.

    The bulls have been quite inept so far this holiday season, and it appears many are getting nervous and skittish. That may be exactly what we need to finally get some action going here. As soon as the Santa Claus rally is declared dead, it will likely begin.

    We have a slightly positive start on the way. Overseas markets are quiet but positive, gold is up again and oil is showing a little life. Prepare for a bumpy ride.

    Position: No positions in stocks mentioned.

  • Tänane MarketWatch on avaldanud artikli Eesti põlevkivist:
    http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story.asp?guid={13A29D75-3F3A-454C-A0FE-C9EB70C27EA9}
  • Autor Kevin Kerr elab üllatulikult Eestis. (new window)
    The new 'Cold War'
    Commentary: Russian gas clampdown could fuel alternative energies


    The Kremlin is well aware that energy is a tried and tested political weapon and they are ready and willing to use it. When I turned on the evening news last night from Russia, watching from my home in Estonia, the first three stories pertained to the Putin administration, energy and the cold, cold winter.
  • Kevin Kerr

    Kevin Kerr is the editor of Resource Trader Alert and the co-editor of Outstanding Investments.

    With 15 years of experience, Kevin is a true veteran of the commodities markets. At age 20, Kevin became one of the youngest members in the history of the New York Finex Exchange. From the Finex Exchange, Kevin became a full seat member of the New York Board of Trade. A licensed commodities trader since 1989, he's worked the trading pits in Chicago and New York with legends like Paul Tudor Jones, and he's even traded commodity derivatives in London. Over his career he's dealt with everything from cotton to currencies to oil and natural gas.

    His unparalleled expertise in futures and commodities has made him a regular contributor to news outlets like CNN fn, CNBC and CBS Marketwatch, where he's been quoted in over 500 articles.


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